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Use Your Voice With ACS CAN To Discuss Health Disparities

By Lucia Kupiec

Cancer has affected us all to some extent, whether it be ourselves or somebody we know and love. While we can all find that personal connection to cancer, it is particularly common in marginalized communities. Cancer is the leading cause of death amongst Hispanic/Latinx people; Prostate cancer is twice as common in Black men than every other racial/ethnic group; Black women are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women; People who identify as LGBTQ suffer higher rates of cervical, breast, and lung cancer. These are just a few of the many staggering statistics proving these discrepancies. This is due to racial bias, poverty, segregation, and fundamental flaws within the healthcare system.

 

 

American Cancer Society is taking steps to minimize the unequal impact on marginalized communities, and make sure that everyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, income, or location, has adequate resources during their battle against cancer. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, also known as ACS CAN, is a non-profit non-partisan affiliate to ACS that takes action towards promoting equal access to treatment, screenings, survival and prevention of cancer across all people. Some topics to highlight with ACS CAN are their work towards greater access to affordable healthcare, and the promotion of greater diversity among clinical trial participants through improved technology.

 

 

ACS CAN has a number of events throughout the year that cover some of these issues, one of which is coming up shortly. The second event is the California Research and Health Equity Policy Forum, which will be held virtually on August 10th at 5:00pm. This forum promotes conversation and education on the disproportionate treatment of cancer for people of color and of those medically underserved. It will also highlight new approaches to addressing and combating these disadvantages. Both events will be an opportunity to vocalize, educate, and communicate about the discrimination marginalized communities face in their fight against cancer, while promoting ways to minimize and eliminate this discrimination.

 

 

You can learn more about the American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion through our partnerships or through research dedicated to health disparities.

 Watch ACS CAN President Lisa Lacasse discuss ACS CAN’s work to advance health equity through access to care, including Medicaid.